fbpx

Asian Longhorned Beetle

The Asian Longhorned Beetle is a very destructive invasive species native to Asia. It was accidentally introduced to the Unites States through wood packing materials. These pests attack a variety of hardwoods including, maples, birches, willows, elm, ash (to name a few).

To see if you have damages on your tree due to the Asian Longhorned Beetle, look for round holes the size of a dime or smaller in tree trunks and branches.

Signs of infestation include: 

  • Round exit holes, about the size of a dime or smaller, in your tree trunks and/or branches
  • Shallow oval or round marks in the bark
  • Material resembling sawdust on the ground around the tree or in the branches
  • Dead branches or limbs falling from an otherwise healthy-looking tree

Do not move firewood from quarantined areas because the beetle can be hidden inside, and then transported and spread to new areas. This pest is very detrimental to trees and often leads to death. 

The longhorned beetle tree check month

Asian Longhorned Beetle: August Is Tree Check Month

The U.S Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is reminding the public that August is Tree Check Month. August is the best time to spot round (almost drill like) holes created by the Asian longhorned beetle. The Asian longhorned beetle is a very destructive invasive species native to Asia. It was …

Asian Longhorned Beetle: August Is Tree Check Month Read More »